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Photography: Gaurav Thombre
Photography: Gaurav Thombre
Bikes

Ridden: Royal Enfield Himalayan BS IV

By Abhishek Wairagade

Published on :
Ridden: Royal Enfield Himalayan BS IV

So have you googled ‘Royal Enfield Himalayan’ yet?

Well, if you google Royal Enfield Himalayan, the first suggested link that pops up is ‘Himalayan issues’ and that is one of the reasons why this RE never took off, unlike its siblings. However, it still managed to form a cult status and off-road enthusiasts swear by this entry-level adventure tourer. Royal Enfield has now infused it with the potion of BS IV updates and a fuel injection. Having spent a fortnight with this Royal Enfield, I can swear that it has become a more forgiving partner as compared to its predecessor. Read on to find out how and why.

Lack of carburettor has led to a vacuum
Lack of carburettor has led to a vacuum

Is it all-new?

All new? Not at all! In fact, you’ll require 20/20 vision along with magnifying glasses to notice the updates. Visually, everything remains the same with the exception of a matte finish blackened tank cover, bar ends and T-bar between the front forks. However, a closer look underneath reveals a massive gap because of the lack of carburettor. There is also a wider pipe for the oil cooler allowing for better flow. In terms of switchgear and instrument cluster, everything remains simple and affable like always, but Royal Enfield has omitted the hazard lights toggle for some reason and there is no headlamp toggle switch as auto headlamp is now mandatory.

Why don’t you put the hazard light toggle switch here, Royal Enfield?
Why don’t you put the hazard light toggle switch here, Royal Enfield?

Is the Royal Enfield Himalayan fun to ride?

The Himalayan remains a simple, adventure tourer and knows its job well. Thanks to fuel injection, the power delivery is now smoother though it is not precise, especially at lower revs. Our test bike hadn’t been run-in so this could be a one-off issue. The BS IV trickery has resulted in additional 9 kilos but the Himalayan feels extremely nimble, even in city conditions. Kudos to the engine’s lugging ability, especially at low revs. I also took it out on a trail ride and came out even happier at the end of the day, which speaks for the Himalayan’s abilities..

There’s fuel but the sensor fails to notice it
There’s fuel but the sensor fails to notice it

Should you get one?

During the testing period, we never faced any issue which speaks for the work Royal Enfield has put into it. If you are into off-roading and also like touring, the Himalayan is currently your only choice.We recommend you take a good look at the recently launched Sleet as it gets even more updates.

Look ma, no carburettor!
Look ma, no carburettor!